Historical dictionary  vol.: 1  let.: M

Mauran, Césaire


Born at Aribeau (Alpes-Maritimes), March 9, 1833.
Taking of the habit at Notre-Dame de l’Osier, June 20 1853.
Oblation at Marseilles June 21, 1854 (no. 369).
Ordination to the priesthood at Marseilles, December 22, 1855.
Died at Diano Marina, May 19, 1905.


Césaire Mauran (AG).

Césaire Mauran was born in Auribeau in the diocese of Fréjus on March 9, 1833, the son of Célestine Giraud and Blaise Pierre Mauran. He made his secondary studies at the minor seminary of Grasse and studied theology for three years at the major seminary of Fréjus. He began his novitiate at Notre-Dame de l’Osier on June 20, 1853 and made his oblation at Marseilles on June 21, 1854. He finished his theological studies at Montolivet in 1854-1855. In his reports, Father Mouchette, the moderator of scholastics, saw talents in Brother Mauran, but he saw defects as well. For example, he wrote: “1854: he is gentle in disposition, perhaps a bit weak and given to extremes. I believe he has a solid basis of virtue and prayer life [...]; 1855: very good health; he pays too much attention to his health; regular in his observance, diligent in carrying out his duties, sometimes flippant, at other times serious [...]” In his notes on some of the scholastic brothers, the Founder wrote in 1855: Brother Mauran: “His general disposition is to follow in everything the mind of his superiors. Nevertheless, we should not deceive ourselves in that he seems to have a special attraction for the foreign missions. He is extremely attached to his holy vocation. He is happy beyond all telling that he has been called.”

Obediences
Césaire Mauran was ordained to the priesthood by Bishop de Mazenod on December 22, 1855 and immediately launched into an intense and fruitful ministry, almost exclusively in preaching. Toward the end of his life, he himself made a list of his obediences. He did, however, omit his obedience to Notre-Dame de Lumières and he gives no dates. From his correspondence and especially from what was written about him in Missions O.M.I., we have succeeded in pinpointing these obediences. “Obediences: While still a deacon, I was appointed professor of rhetoric at Montolivet (1855). After my ordination to the priesthood, Rev. Father Fabre call me to take the chair of Holy Scripture at the major seminary of Marseilles (1856). Since this sedentary life did not suit very well my fiery temperament, my worthy superiors sent me to Aix under the wise direction of Father Courtès. Three years at Aix (1856-1858, 1859-1860). One year at Notre-Dame de la Garde as treasurer (1858-1859). Twice in Le Calvaire (1861-1863, 1888-1890). [At Notre-Dame de Lumières (1863-1870).] Three times at Notre-Dame de l’Osier (1870-1874, 1885-1887, 1890-1894). Back again at Aix (1875-1876). [Eight] years at Notre-Dame de Bon Secours (1877-1885). From Notre-Dame de l’Osier, six months at Aix (1894) while awaiting the founding of our house in Nice where I remained for ten years, the time during which this foundation lasted (1894-1904 expulsions). At the present time, at Diano Marina (1904-1905), Mauran.”

The Mission Preacher
Father Mauran held the office of treasurer in a few houses and always worked as a mission preacher, except in 1875-1876. Because his health had been undermined, he accepted the post of chaplain at the convent of the Visitation Sisters in Aix. The author of a long narration of the mission of Ajaccio (Missions O.M.I., 1896, P. 222-258) made an assessment of each one of the missionaries. Concerning Father Mauran, he wrote: This priest “presented to us another form of eloquence, but one that was no less pleasing and at times very enthralling. From his mouth proceed milk and honey, os melle fluens [a mouth flowing with honey]. From his lips pours in full flood and without ever abating the dulcis apum labor [sweet product of the bee’s labor], that is, elegance and persuasion. His penetrating speech, soothing and sweet, always and without fail found its way into people’s hearts. He was especially able to communicate the attractiveness of prayer. His fine sermons on the occasion of two parishes being consecrated to the Blessed Virgin and of the promulgation of the law were veritable triumphs...”

In a report on the house of Nice in 1902, Father Moyet, the superior, introduced each priest in his community. When referring to Father Mauran, he said: “He is the mission preacher who, for fifty years, has broadcast the word of the Gospel in every corner of the Midi with the cheerfulness for which he is well known. He was one of the first priests in the house at Nice when it was founded. Since he possessed a thorough knowledge of the Provençal language, with its proverbs and its various dialects, he was a powerful help in a region where many people, especially in the mountainous areas, do not know the French idiom well. Even today in many towns he evangelized, he often adopts a southern speech which everyone understands. And he is proud to be able to say that the Founder of the Congregation, Bishop de Mazenod used to preach in Provençal [...] Father Mauran is tireless. His list of preaching assignments during the year is a long one...”

Expelled with the other priests from the house in Nice in 1904, he retired to Diano Marina. He subsequently published the work: Mois de sainte Marie-Madeleine, le parfait modèle de l’amour pénitent, Méditations sur ses litanies, [Month of St. Mary Magdalene, the perfect model of penitent love. Meditations on her litany], Paris, 1905, 190 pages. He died at Diano Marina on May 19, 1905 at the age of 72.

Yvon Beaudoin, o.m.i.

Sources
Oblate General Archives in Rome. Oblation formula Marseilles, 1854, retreat notes (1867-1898, 42 p.); 32 letters to Father Sardou and a few others to Fathers Fabre, Soullier and Tatin.

View all »

36th General Chapter 2016
36th General Chapter 2016
Oblate Triennium
Oblate Triennium
OMI Vocations
OMI Vocations
Aix-en-Provence
Aix-en-Provence
Oblatio
Oblatio
Links to Other Oblate Sites
Links to Other Oblate Sites
Newsletter